Gordon-Conwell Blog

Miroslav Volf at Gordon-Conwell

November 30, 2011

Miroslav Volf recently spoke at Gordon-Conwell on his most recent book, Allah: A Christian Response. Below is his talk in its entirety.

 

Tags: equipping leaders for the church and society , thoughtfully evangelical

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Rule of Thirds

November 28, 2011

Megan Hackman

Photography loves the rule of thirds, which sets up shots like the picture on the right. 

You're encouraged to photograph the object of your focus either at an intersection point or along one of the lines (as illustrated with the skyline, above). The rest of the grid provides the space to help your eye focus on the object of interest, because the human eye naturally is drawn to focus along this one-thirds gridline.

A mentor suggested that we might live focusing unnecessarily on a narrow grid of thirds. We (and especially seminarians, I would argue) spend life focusing one-at-a-time on one of three activities: the first third of life studying for work; the second third working; and the third resting from all that time we spent working.

What if we lived life focusing less on the division of the thirds and more on the intersection points? That is, what if we did not spend 30 years in school, 30 years at work, and 30 years resting? What if we lived with work and study and rest all in one mixed life? What if we let the boundaries cross between work and play and rest? What if we lived life a bit more looking for these intersection points week-to-week and less on the anticipation of a major switch in activity every 30 years?

I’m getting a taste of this by using a similar grid to analyze my life for one of my classes. Every week, I look at a 7 (for the days) x 3 (morning, afternoon, night) grid. I’m looking to include periods of work, study, and rest, all side-by-side with plenty of times where they intersect in order to allow for analysis of study, creativity in work, and depth in rest. I allow a greater focus on rest than I have allowed myself formerly, as I’ve been introduced to Sabbath rest in seminary, which I will return to in the next post.

For now, I encourage you to consider… Are you living in an isolated stratum of study, work, or rest? Where might you find an intersection point? Can you offer any encouragement as to where you’ve found benefit in the times where rest, study, and work meet?

Megan Hackman and her husband, Larry, are M.Div. students at Gordon-Conwell's Hamilton campus.

Tags: Author: Megan Hackman , biblically-grounded , equipping leaders for the church and society , spiritually vital , student life , thoughtfully evangelical

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Good Morning, Megan...from Colorado: A friend from NH sent me your blog post. Most grateful am I that he did. I say...hooray!...keep it up!!...way to go!!! And that was done in thirds. :-) Your post radiates with a thought I've been proposing for years now...live all of your life in all of what I do call the Three 3rds of life. But what you've done so well is invite your reader into living live daily with the thirds you suggest. I like what you've done.......! Fast chasing 70yo, I've come to realize (and much of this realization began in full force when a student at Denver Seminary 38 years ago) that we limit ourselves, our dreams, our hopes, our relationships, our potential of what can be accomplished in our lifetimes if we accept the cultural norm (especially in our Christian circles...for the most part...i know there are exceptions...but not enough of them) of what you state about the 30/30/30 of a life here in our western culture. What if...what if courageously, creatively, daringly, purposefully, intentionally...we did not buy into the cultural norm? What if, no matter our age, we chose to live intentionally, experiencing deep change in each decade of our life? What if, as we grew older, we were not looking for done and finished, but there are more horizons to explore and discover? We could go on and on....... :-) So today, I celebrate what you suggest. May our Triune God further bless you and your husband as you study, work and rest forward...day by day. How do I sign up to keep receiving your life-giving, life-challenging thoughts. You've gained one more fan today from here in the Rockies. Wes Roberts Leadership Mentor/Organizational Designer/Spiritual Friend Leadership Design Group 17053 Hastings Avenue Parker, CO 80134 iPhone: 303-809-6503 Website: http://wesroberts.typepad.com/wes/ You will also find me on Facebook And some of the seminarians I mentor out here finally have me on Twitter @thewesroberts
Wes Roberts 8:11AM 11/29/11

Thank You: A Repeat of Last Year's Advent Devotional

November 24, 2011

In an effort to wisely use our limited resources, we decided not to print a new Advent Devotional this year. However, with the Advent season approaching, we wanted to make last year's devotional available to you for download. We hope this helps to prepare your heart, again, for the coming of our Lord.

Download our 2010 Advent Devotional.

Tags: equipping leaders for the church and society

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Thanks, sharing this again this year with the staff at Barium Springs Home for Children through their staff Prayer Request page...
Abby Vinez 1:58PM 12/06/11
Thank you so much for posting this. I had been counting on GCTS for my Advent devotions.
Anne Hilborn 8:26AM 12/02/11
This is a wonderful devotional - thank you for making it available again.
Caroline 10:41AM 11/28/11

The Seven-Year M.Div.: First Impressions

November 21, 2011

Brian

Author’s Note: Journeys are strange. You hardly ever end up where you thought you would, and you definitely never get there in the manner that you conceived. That has been as true for me as it was for Jonah the morning he woke up to take a leisurely cruise to Tarshish. Over the next few weeks I will be writing a series of blog posts exploring how I came to and through seminary. It’s a strange tale with no straight lines. But it’s my story, and it is the path that the Lord has led our family down. It’s not idyllic. I hope that encourages you. Also, in case you just joined the conversation, Part 1 can be found here; Part 2 can be found here; Part 3 can be found here.

My first year in the M.Div. program at Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte campus was a bit of a shock to my recovering fundamentalist sensibilities. I was working 50-60 hours per week for Young Life in Pinehurst, NC, and took a week of vacation in order to drive 2.5 hours every day for an entire week in July to take my first course: “Introduction to the Old Testament” with Dr. Tim Laniak. Sounds simple enough, right? Here is the way the week was going to go in my mind: a nice man with a goatee was going to sit down and introduce me to….well…the Old Testament. I was excited for this. However, I should have read the syllabus [Note to all prospective students – always read the syllabus. I should have picked up this trick in college, but was too busy chasing my cute wife. Something’s name and what it actually is can often be quite different. For example, I went to college at TCU, and we are the Horned Frogs. Frogs with horns, right? Wrong – they have little horns, but aren’t frogs at all. If the NHFAA, the National Horned Frog Association of America, had a syllabus for you to read, and you would have read it, you would know that. And you would know that their natural defense mechanism is to spit blood out of their eyes. Well, you get the idea. Read the syllabus. OK, back to the story].

The first day of class, my professor explained that our course should have been titled “Old Testament Criticism”. Dr. Laniak, who is an excellent professor, earned his ThD at Harvard Divinity School and was about to introduce us to the field of biblical scholarship and what it had to say concerning the Old Testament. The course was fascinating: over the week we learned about issues concerning authorship, archaeology, linguistics (there is an actual language called Akkadian, The Rock didn’t just make it up for the movie “The Scorpion King”), inspiration, historicity, and more. And we didn’t just read evangelical protestant authors – we read authors writing from all different types of backgrounds. The environment was scholarly and faithful, challenging and safe. Throughout his lectures, Dr. Laniak handled everything with the quiet confidence of a man who has studied at the highest level and also maintains a very active Christian faith of his own.

Such an engagement of the heart, soul, mind, and strength was a new experience for me. In fundamentalism, I had learned that conflicting information is a threat and that the two responses to such information are either fear or anger. Dr. Laniak taught me that there is no reason to fear scholarship, nor do I need to worship it, but it is unacceptable to ignore it. Thus began my theological education. Lesson one: evangelicals can engage in scholarship at the highest level and still maintain a vibrant faith. Seminary is not a cemetery.

Brian has an M.Div. (2010) from Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte campus, a Th.M. (2011) in Historical Theology from the South Hamilton campus, and is currently strengthening his language skills while in the MACH program. He hopes to matriculate into a doctoral program in August 2012 that will allow him to continue in his study of the thought of Augustine of Hippo. He has a wonderful wife, three great children, and spent ten years in ministry to teenagers, primarily with Young Life International.

Tags: Author: Brian , biblically-grounded , future students , spiritually vital , student blogger , thoughtfully evangelical

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Learning from Our Church Fathers

November 18, 2011

Dr. Donald Fairbairn

We live in a society infatuated with novelty. From clothes to cars to computers to TVs to hand-held electronic devices, we are told we should want the latest, the newest, the hottest, the best. Given our love affair with the new and supposedly improved, it is a bit surprising that people of all stripes today are growing increasingly interested in a period of history we call “the early church” (from about AD 100-600), also known as the “patristic period” or the period of the “church fathers.” Of course, Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox have long been interested in the centuries just after the close of the New Testament. But today, Protestants and even scholars with no particular religious affiliation are giving the early church a lot of attention. Why?

To explain this phenomenon, I like to use the phrase “historical authority,” by which I mean people’s desire to legitimize their own beliefs (whatever they are) by showing that those beliefs have a long-standing pedigree, that such beliefs were around as far back as the ancient world. Catholics and Orthodox insist that their current practice is directly continuous with the practice of the early church. Liberal Protestants and non-religious people—both deeply imbued with a relativistic spirit—insist that there was no consensus about either doctrine or practice in the early church, but instead there was a vast array of differing “Christianities,” none of which was any better or more “right” than any others. In all of these cases, people find in the early church what they want to find; they discover a consensus or lack of consensus that provides warrant—“authority,” if you will—for their own convictions about the contemporary world.

Where do evangelicals stand in the midst of these forays into the early church? Well, for the most part, we stand on the sidelines. Priding ourselves on our commitment to Scripture alone, we have often demonstrated that commitment by paying little attention to the centuries after the end of the New Testament. After all, something isn’t true just because a church father says it, and for that matter, even the Nicene Creed doesn’t carry the same weight of authority as the Bible. Why, then, should we pay attention to the non-inspired writers of a period in the distant past, when we could be focusing on the Bible itself and on the immediacy of our current situation?

Over the next several weeks, I would like to suggest various different answers to this question—different reasons that combine to show us why it can be valuable for us to attend to the Christians of the first few centuries after the New Testament.

Dr. Donald Fairbairn is the Robert E. Cooley Professor of Early Christianity. His responsibilities include further developing the Robert C. Cooley Center for the Study of Early Christianity at the Charlotte campus, which explores the historical foundations of the Christian faith.

 

 

 

Tags: Author: Donald Fairbairn , current students , faculty blogger , spiritually vital , thoughtfully evangelical

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"After all, something isn’t true just because a church father says it, and for that matter, even the Nicene Creed doesn’t carry the same weight of authority as the Bible." Don, there was a time a few years ago when I would have cried, "not true" to the statement you made above. But, as I have grown in the Lord, I am understanding that as responsible Christians (no matter what denomination) we have to deal specifically with what the Fathers say about certain topics, not just take them at their word. No one human is always correct on spiritual matters. As I have read the Fathers over the last few years (In English I should add), I have been frequently surprised to see that they do not agree unanimously on all things! Indeed, when I read books written from Roman Catholic and Orthodox perspectives I am often puzzled by the authors apparent opinion that the Fathers speak as one unanimous voice on every Christian point of Doctrine. This, of course, is not true at all. I am encouraged when Evangelical Christians seriously study the Fathers, like you do, in the understanding that they have much wisdom to impart, but not above the wisdom found in Scripture. I appreciate your charitable scholarship in this field and I look forward to learning more of what you have discovered through your assessment of Patristics. Joseph
Joseph C. Justice 6:13PM 10/08/13
As you have said that this is the time that we should lead people to concentrate on the Bible rather than the history of the early church fathers. Different people with their different religious background have their own understanding regarding the early church fathers. Some of these religion leaders let the people to worship church fathers. The stories of the church fathers might have an affirmative contribution to our life. Some of their systems of beliefs and doctrinal settings is very important for us.(Like Trinity, the doctrine of Christ..). On the other hand, the traditional religion believers worship their ancestral spirit. Some of them claim that their dead father or grandfather visit them. They should worship and provide sacrifice to the spirit. They don’t have a book but, they overruled by the ancestral spirit. We have the Word of God, the 66 books which is written divinely using kings, shepherds, fishermen, historians, priests, a scribe, a tax collector, a doctor a royal cup-bearer a government official and others. These people were in different place and lived in different time. The word of God is enough as it is said at 2Timothy 3:16 ll scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness. In Some place the present evangelical church elders and ministers, try to curse the present and praise the previous believers. According to my understanding this is also the same as of giving the authority for the practice in the early church. As evangelicals we believe in the authority of the Bible not in the practice. Dr. Donald thank you I have learned a lot of things and it helped me to think deeply.
Seleshi Andarge 2:35PM 01/04/13
I'm excited for this series!
Brian Gronewoller 8:56AM 11/21/11

Meet Gordon-Conwell Alum, Dr. Ben Witherington!

November 16, 2011

Ever wonder what people do after they graduate seminary? The first in a series of videos, we're profiling alumni and asking them about life after Gordon-Conwell. Dr. Ben Witherington is Amos Professor of New Testament for Doctoral Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary and graduated from Gordon-Conwell in 1977.

Tags: Alumni , current students , equipping leaders for the church and society , future students , spiritually vital , thoughtfully evangelical

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Why I Chose Gordon-Conwell

November 15, 2011

Brian

Author’s Note: Journeys are strange. You hardly ever end up where you thought you would, and you definitely never get there in the manner that you conceived. That has been as true for me as it was for Jonah the morning he woke up to take a leisurely cruise to Tarshish. Over the next few weeks I will be writing a series of blog posts exploring how I came to and through seminary. It’s a strange tale with no straight lines. But it’s my story, and it is the path that the Lord has led our family down. It’s not idyllic. I hope that encourages you. Also, in case you just joined the conversation, Part 1 can be found here and Part 2 can be found here.

God works in mysterious ways. In the case of how I ended up at Gordon-Conwell, he worked for my good in a way that I could not see in spite of my focus in a different direction. So how did I end up at Gordon-Conwell? To quote Prince Herbert from Monty Python and the Holy Grail: “Well, I’ll tell you.” (cue music)

After taking my first seven courses through Fuller, my job in Colorado transferred me to a small golf community in North Carolina. It was a long move for our family, but one that we were excited to make. In the midst of having three children, sometimes it is difficult to keep all of the details of life at the forefront of one’s mind. Thus, it was a short while after arriving in North Carolina that I realized that the nearest Fuller campus was in Colorado Springs – a mere 1700 miles away. My pay level was prohibitive to flights back and forth, so I began searching for a new school.

Now, at this point in the story I have to explain that those of us from Colorado are a bit different. We like to wear sandals and shorts. A lot. We also don’t dress up much. However, people in North Carolina do.

Thus, as I started searching for seminaries within 150 miles of my home I became a bit disconcerted that everyone – everyone! – on the website of each school that I looked at was wearing a suit. I didn’t have anything against suits, it was just that, as someone who worked with high school kids at the time, I preferred casual clothing in the groups with which I spent my time.

And then I found it shining in the night – more beautiful than William Shatner’s spoken version of “Rocket Man”: the Gordon-Conwell Charlotte Campus website. There were lots of smiling faces and no three-piece suits. I was intrigued. So, I called down, scheduled a campus visit and the rest, as they say, is history.

I wish that I could write that I chose Gordon-Conwell because of its wonderful and inquisitive student body (which it has), its academically challenging atmosphere (it is), and its excellent faculty members (they are), but I did not. I chose Gordon-Conwell because of the fashion choices of those on their website.

Addendum: The irony in this story is that the Lord used such a frivolous way to make a decision in order to show me my love for the academic world. Within a few years I would discover my love for studying and begin to pursue a career in academia, all of which required that I be at such an academically rigorous school. However, that story is for a later post. Next time I will talk a bit about my time with the wonderful people at GCTS-Charlotte.

Brian has an M.Div. (2010) from Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte campus, a Th.M. (2011) in Historical Theology from the South Hamilton campus, and is currently strengthening his language skills while in the MACH program. He hopes to matriculate into a doctoral program in August 2012 that will allow him to continue in his study of the thought of Augustine of Hippo. He has a wonderful wife, three great children, and spent ten years in ministry to teenagers, primarily with Young Life International.

Tags: Author: Brian , Charlotte campus , equipping leaders for the church and society , future students , student blogger

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My Seminary Experience Part 2: How I Began Studying at a Seminary

November 11, 2011

Brian

Author’s Note: Journeys are strange. You hardly ever end up where you thought you would, and you definitely never get there in the manner that you conceived. That has been as true for me as it was for Jonah the morning he woke up to take a leisurely cruise to Tarshish. Over the next few weeks I will be writing a series of blog posts exploring how I came to and through seminary. It’s a strange tale with no straight lines. But it’s my story, and it is the path that the Lord has led our family down. It’s not idyllic. I hope that encourages you. Also, in case you just joined the conversation, the beginning of the series can be found here.

So there I was. I had a wife and a baby and I had just quit the only job that I had ever known. What now? Although I had attended college at a major Division I university (TCU), I was from a very small town in the mountains and wasn’t sure how to get where I wanted to go. In some ways I was not even sure where to go. Beyond that, there were not many people with the right knowledge and experience to help me. My tradition did not encourage graduate-level education and no one in my family had ever attended either a graduate school of religion or a seminary. So, I spent a few months working on a construction job for a friend of mine and tried to clear my head…and my soul.

And then God decided that it was time.

An acquaintance from Young Life offered me a job. It was a full-time position, but if I would put in the work, they would pay for my first seven seminary courses. Because of the status of our growing family I was looking for way to go to school while still working to support our family. Since I already had training in youth work, and at the time that is what I felt called to spend my life doing, this was an ideal situation for me. After praying about it, my wife and I agreed that this was the opportunity for which our family had been looking. So we sold our home, packed up what little we had, and moved across Wolf Creek Pass to Alamosa, CO, where our second daughter would soon be born.

And that’s how I ended up studying at Fuller Theological Seminary’s Colorado Springs Campus (yes, I know, I’m now at Gordon-Conwell. That stage is coming soon).

Ten years ago, through a muddy mess – particularly in my soul – I took my first course through Young Life’s agreement with Fuller Theological Seminary: The Life of Jesus, with Prof. Dale Bruner. Those hours sitting in class with Prof. Bruner were like turtle cheesecake for my soul. Seriously. It’s a great thing when God meets a desire in our souls in a way that is more abundant than we had previously hoped. Every day as Dr. Bruner would skillfully walk us through each chapter of the Book of John it felt as if the Mississippi River was being released onto the Sahara Desert of my soul.
Over the next two years I was able to take some incredible courses – Theology and Film, Adolescent Psychology, Mentored Ministry, and more. The time spent studying and thinking in those courses confirmed that I was exactly where I should be – engaging God in a way that included my mind.

There was a certain ineffable joy in the entire experience.

This was the first step in a long series of events that have brought me to where I am now. But it was not the only step. In my next post, I will explain how I ended up at Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte, NC campus, and eventually at the campus here in Hamilton, MA.

Brian has an M.Div. (2010) from Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte campus, a Th.M. (2011) in Historical Theology from the South Hamilton campus, and is currently strengthening his language skills while in the MACH program. He hopes to matriculate into a doctoral program in August 2012 that will allow him to continue in his study of the thought of Augustine of Hippo. He has a wonderful wife, three great children, and spent ten years in ministry to teenagers, primarily with Young Life International.

 

Tags: Author: Brian , equipping leaders for the church and society , future students , student blogger

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Can You Study Abroad in Seminary?

November 09, 2011

Hear the stories and thoughts of students and a professor who went to Greece and Turkey this past summer to study the life of Paul.

Learn more about the Global Education program at Gordon-Conwell by visiting www.gordonconwell.edu/Global-Education.

Tags: current students , globally engaged , spiritually vital

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I am very glad to know that the Gordon-Conwell is providing global education courses to all range of degree programs. It will be a big opportunity for the students participating in it. They will learn a lot of thing from this program.....
peter 4:33AM 11/10/11
Hello from an alum in Kenya! I happily invite GCTS students to come take a few courses at the Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology with our MA & MDiv students from all over Africa. What could be better than studying the Word in a truly global context? Great chance to be part of 'the next Christendom'! We're fully accredited so the credits could transfer if you make arrangements ahead of time at GCTS. (Dr. Hollinger will give permission for that, won't you?!)
Stephanie Black 11:55PM 11/09/11

Happy Endings

November 07, 2011

Megan Hackman

A culture’s ultimate desire can often be observed at the end of a movie. Watching the Chinese film, Hero, displays ultimate honor. Perhaps the Persian film The Color of Paradise could be articulated as a desire for belonging. But I’m relating with the new TV show “Once Upon a Time” (written by the writers of “Lost”), which clearly articulates a desire for a happy ending. That is, of course, the ending of every fairy tale. But this particular show has drawn more out than a simple “happily ever after.”

What draws us to happy endings? Dr. Gwenfair Adams teaches my class called Dynamics of the Spiritual Life. The first day of class we set the context for studying the dynamics in our own individual spiritual lives within a story arch she calls our mallon or more and more story line. It is our individual expression of the hapax or once-and-for-all story line that Scripture depicts. Allow me to explain…

The desire of the hapax story of Scripture is for the Creator God to be in perfect relationship with his creation. It is a story of conflict against the enemy of sin and death overcome by the protagonist, Christ. In light of the hapax, then, we delve into our own mallon stories, seeing how our own life aims toward the ultimate desire of being re-united with Christ and re-created into the perfect image of our Creator. Our testimonies serve as witnesses of the ultimate Author and the consummation of the world to come. This is the story that the history of the world is telling.

So, then, it is no surprise that I have noticed a trend in media lately articulating a craving for a happy ending complete with evil vanquished and perfect love restored. I am seeing that the characters in this TV show are articulating the once-and-for-all desires of our world. The writers have actually written, “believing in the possibility of a happy ending is a very powerful thing” and “good will always win.” I am drawn to watch and re-watch the episodes, looking for glimpses of the finale in which evil will be vanquished and life brought back at the instigation of true love. So when I see a simple, silver cross hanging from the neck of Snow White (she really is wearing a cross in the show), I can’t help but think, Do the writers know the hapax story?

Where do you see the desire for a happy ending being articulated in our culture?

Megan Hackman and her husband, Larry, are M.Div. students at Gordon-Conwell's Hamilton campus.

Tags: Author: Megan Hackman , current students , student blogger

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Happy ending is always the best and what we love to see at the end of any story........
Graham 1:54AM 11/16/11
It is true that happy ending is a powerful thing. I enjoyed reading this post. Thanks for sharing..............
Kelvin 7:30AM 11/08/11
I love this show! And Megan Hackman. The (Happy) End. :)
Jill 4:37PM 11/07/11

My Seminary Experience, Part 1: Struggling with the Idea of Going Back to School

November 04, 2011

Brian

Author’s Note: Journeys are strange. You hardly ever end up where you thought you would, and you definitely never get there in the manner that you conceived. That has been as true for me as it was for Jonah the morning he woke up to take a leisurely cruise to Tarshish. Over the next few weeks I will be writing a series of blog posts exploring how I came to and through seminary. It’s a strange tale with no straight lines. But it’s my story, and it is the path that the Lord has led our family down. It’s not idyllic. I hope that encourages you.

Ten years ago, I was a youth pastor at a small youth center in my hometown – Pagosa Springs, CO. Life was great. I had a degree from a good university. My wife and I had just brought home our first baby girl to a house that we had built down the street from my parents. We lived in one of the most beautiful locations in the United States, and I had what I thought was my dream job.

Things were great, except for the fact that things were not really that great. Living near my family was wonderful, but my job situation had slowly deteriorated as I had continued to chafe at some of the doctrines and practices within our ministry. To put it succinctly, there were many moments where form was valued over function. While struggling with this, I also concurrently suppressed questions that I had about my own faith.

I was lost in fundamentalist limbo, and I needed help.

I began groping for relief from this suspended state. When I mentioned to my closest mentor that I had a desire to return to school and learn for the sake of both my own soul and those to whom I was ministering, I was consistently met with a response betraying a chary feeling towards education: I could go to school but…you know…1 Corinthians says that knowledge “puffs up”. The nonverbal exhortation I received was clear, and it never fluctuated: “Well, you can go to seminary and be a Christian, but you won’t be a very good one.”

Again, fundamentalist limbo.

It was nearly a decade ago that I finally reached my breaking point. I began to spiral into a deep depression as I perceived that I had to choose between my inner conflict and my faith. My desire to learn felt like a worm that was eating me from the inside out. Prayer was too silent. Reading the Bible felt flat. I had reached a state where I had not properly nourished my mind and my lopsided fulfillment of the Great Commission was having noxious effects on my soul. I had focused on loving the Lord with all of my heart, soul, and strength. Yet, the neglect of my mind caused an atrophy that was spreading like a cancer over my entire being.

In the fall of October 2002, I knew that something had to be done for the sake of my soul, my family, and my ministry. I did not know where things would go from there. I did not know if Jesus was on the other side. I just knew that I could not continue in my current state. So one night I turned in my letter of resignation and decided that I would find a job that would allow me to study as well.

And then I moved on.

Brian has an M.Div. (2010) from Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte campus, a Th.M. (2011) in Historical Theology from the South Hamilton campus, and is currently strengthening his language skills while in the MACH program. He hopes to matriculate into a doctoral program in August 2012 that will allow him to continue in his study of the thought of Augustine of Hippo. He has a wonderful wife, three great children, and spent ten years in ministry to teenagers, primarily with Young Life International.

Tags: Author: Brian , current students , equipping leaders for the church and society , future students , student blogger

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Larry: Allow me lavish copious amounts of praise, perhaps leading to a panegyric, upon you for noticing my GRE word. However, now I may have to be chary of you stalking my posts... Heidi: Small world, eh? Who would have ever thought that two Pagosans would end up living within five miles of each other in Massachusetts? I'm going to see if I have a picture from back in the day with you and/or your sisters to put in the next post for the sake of nostalgia.
Brian Gronewoller 9:59PM 11/06/11
Having begun my faith in that same Pagosa Springs youth center, I can definitely relate to this. Although I ended up a few miles down the road at Gordon College about 10 years ago. Looking forward to the next post.
Heidi 3:09PM 11/04/11
Thank you for using the word "chary." And for sharing your story.
Larry 10:55AM 11/04/11

Alumni Impact

November 02, 2011

Gordon-Conwell alumni are one of the biggest reasons why students attend Gordon-Conwell. Enjoy this glimpse of student life on campus. Thank you, alumni, for helping students find their way here.



Music courtesy of Matt Scott (M.Div. '11) @ http://musicmattscott.com/

 

Tags: Alumni , life on campus , student life

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