Gordon-Conwell Blog

MAR: Workplace Theology, Ethics and Leadership

January 27, 2012

Our Master of Arts - Workplace Theology, Ethics and Leadership is a cohort-based degree for those with workplace experience who desire to live out their Christian faith in the secular marketplace. This past week, they spent the week in New York City discussing money, finance, profit, debt, marketing, sales, and consumerism – in the perspective of biblical stewardship, honesty, truthfulness, and diligence. Below are a few pictures from their time in NYC.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to learn more? View MAR-WTEL details on our website or request information today and one of our Admissions Representatives will contact you!

Tags: equipping leaders for the church and society , student life , thoughtfully evangelical

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This is wonderful and much needed in the world we live in. Our Christian influence is not only our responsibility but, without a doubt, a necessity for these times. Our Heavenly Father wants to work through us to effect His will in our society.
Mark Vaughn 10:52AM 02/27/12
I've never heard of a Master of Arts degree, or any other degree for that matter, with this name or focus. It sounds very interesting and much needed in today's time. I'm glad Gordon-Conwell is offering this type of degree. Biblical stewardship is something many Christians, I don't think , are not aware of. Everything that is in this world, including many secular things that we don't associate with religion, are talked about and are dealt with in the Bible. The Bible tells how to deal with anything we encounter and with all aspects of life. From education, business, relationships, money, emotions, etc., the Bible covers it all. Christians need to learn more about the answers the Bible has for us and began to use them in our everyday lives.
Deric T. Shaw 4:25PM 01/27/12

Sabbath: Substance or Merely Shadows?

January 24, 2012

Megan Hackman

Studying Colossians this week has reawakened my thoughts on Sabbath, which we started discussing in December. Colossians 2:16-17 reads, “Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink, or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath. These are a shadow of the things to come, but the substance belongs to Christ.” After studying this passage through the week, I spent Sabbath on Sunday considering whether or not the practice of Sabbath for me has become an embrace of shadow or substance.

The shadows Paul is discussing were all good, Old Testament instructions for the people of God. They involved dietary laws, festival guidelines, and Sabbath keeping. They cast an outline of beautiful promises given in the direct presence of God, including rest (Gen 2:3), provision (Ex 16:5), and remembrance (Ex 20:8; Deut 5:15). The unfolding of this promise of Sabbath rest continues straight through Jesus’ proclamation of healing (Lk 13:16) and provision on the Sabbath day (Lk 6:3-5). Finally, it will find its fulfillment in eternity when we enter the Sabbath rest that remains for the people of God (Heb 4:9-10).

So my struggle this weekend centered on recognizing how much of the past two years I have spent enveloped and actually pursuing the promises of the shadow of Sabbath. By practicing Sabbath on Sundays, I actively sought rest and rhythm. These shadows are certainly provided by merely ceasing to work for one day. The promises of Sabbath shadows are good things, but we are able to walk in fellowship with Christ himself (Heb 4:16)! We no longer settle for mere shadows.

So what of the substance of Sabbath? I think it’s possible that in my headlong pursuit of the shadows, I have at times missed the substance of Christ.

Sunday was a regeneration of the pursuit of Christ for me in the practice of Sabbath. I have been asked to expand upon what it means to “tune into the bass line,” as discussed weeks ago. For me, to look upon the substance of Christ and to enter his presence requires stillness, confession, and prayer. Often I will follow that by meditating upon a particular verse. Sometimes I find walking slowly through the woods helps me to converse more naturally with my Creator. I suggest Adele Calhoun’s Spiritual Disciplines Handbook if you are looking for some creative ways to hear God’s bass line call in your life.

My aim is to not just embrace the outline of God’s promises, but to embrace He who casts the shadows directly. I am inhibited from doing that the more I emphasize the pursuit of physical rest. Instead, when I envision the Lamb in the throne room or the man walking along the road of Emmaus, I can begin to dialogue with and expose myself to my God for transformation that satisfies the need for both physical and spiritual rest and that continues throughout the week.

That designated, full-day intimacy is worth the pursuit of Sabbath. It helps me embrace of the very substance of Christ in the rest of the week.

Megan Hackman and her husband, Larry, are M.Div. students at Gordon-Conwell's Hamilton campus.

Tags: Author: Megan Hackman , biblically-grounded , student blogger , student life , thoughtfully evangelical

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John-- at the core of your question it appears to me that you and the person you were talking with might be asking, what is the purpose of the law for today? Dr. Gordon Hugenberger has some interesting thoughts on the different classifications of Old Testament law and the applications in the inaugurated Kingdom. There is both ceremonial and moral law. According to him, "moral law is designed to replicate in humans the moral likeness of God" (Class notes from Theology of the Pentateuch) So, as seen in the Sermon on the Mount, these laws persist not for the purpose of salvation but for the life of someone in relationship with God. Ceremonial law, however, has exceptions, is less permanent, and symbolical. He lists Sabbath as ceremonial along with baptism, tithing, etc., because there were exceptions in the OT made for offering sacrifices on the Sabbath not as the first day of the week in special circumstances. It is included in Col 2:16-17 as "a shadow pointing to the reality of Christ, who has now come" (Class notes). As far as it is an imitation of God, however, it is considered a moral law and thus still applicable. The classification of Sabbath, then, is not definitive from what I have found. But should Sabbath be only followed today because it's a moral law? I would say no based on Colossians 2:16-17. But are we invited to rest from our labors as God did from his in the real sense of stopping to work on Sundays? I am saying yes, I think that is an invitation that has found a significant and valid expression in my life. I think ceasing from our work allows us the opportunity to approach God directly and intentionally. I do think it is wonderful to have a Sabbath attitude that pervades our lives. I have found that without the rhythm of regular, prolonged ceasing, I am incapable of having a pervading attitude regarding Sabbath during th week. Regarding your comment, "the law condemns and cannot produce true righteousness,"-- yet the law is good and governs our relationship with a holy God. So should we "rest" from such a futile effort as pursuing holiness? I don't think so. I look to multiple New Testament passages for encouragement in that pursuit-- Rom 6:1-4; Phil 2:12-18; Heb 10:14.
Megan Hackman 1:59PM 02/11/12
John-- at the core of your question it appears to me that you and the person you were talking with might be asking, what is the purpose of the law for today? Dr. Gordon Hugenberger has some interesting thoughts on the different classifications of Old Testament law and the applications in the inaugurated Kingdom. There is both ceremonial and moral law. According to him, "moral law is designed to replicate in humans the moral likeness of God" (Class notes from Theology of the Pentateuch) So, as seen in the Sermon on the Mount, these laws persist not for the purpose of salvation but for the life of someone in relationship with God. Ceremonial law, however, has exceptions, is less permanent, and symbolical. He lists Sabbath as ceremonial along with baptism, tithing, etc., because there were exceptions in the OT made for offering sacrifices on the Sabbath not as the first day of the week in special circumstances. It is included in Col 2:16-17 as "a shadow pointing to the reality of Christ, who has now come" (Class notes). As far as it is an imitation of God, however, it is considered a moral law and thus still applicable. The classification of Sabbath, then, is not definitive from what I have found. But should Sabbath be only followed today because it's a moral law? I would say no based on Colossians 2:16-17. But are we invited to rest from our labors as God did from his in the real sense of stopping to work on Sundays? I am saying yes, I think that is an invitation that has found a significant and valid expression in my life. I think ceasing from our work allows us the opportunity to approach God directly and intentionally. I do think it is wonderful to have a Sabbath attitude that pervades our lives. I have found that without the rhythm of regular, prolonged ceasing, I am incapable of having a pervading attitude regarding Sabbath during th week. Regarding your comment, "the law condemns and cannot produce true righteousness,"-- yet the law is good and governs our relationship with a holy God. So should we "rest" from such a futile effort as pursuing holiness? I don't think so. I look to multiple New Testament passages for encouragement in that pursuit-- Rom 6:1-4; Phil 2:12-18; Heb 10:14.
Megan Hackman 1:59PM 02/11/12
I don't have any developed thoughts on it. You've already done more research on it than I have. I just found this passage interesting when someone asked me why we don't observe the Sabbath anymore, at least the way commanded in the OT. It seems whereas Israel had a shadow of rest by observing it on a particular day, we have it in a more complete form (of course, we are still waiting the final rest of the Lord). So, instead of one day of Sabbath, we have a lifestyle of Sabbath when we enter by faith. I was wondering, then, if the works might refer to works of the Law. Since Law only condemns and cannot produce true righteousness, faith gives us rest from such futile efforts. These are just tentative thoughts. Like I said, I have not researched it. Let me know if you find out anything. Thanks, John
John 6:48PM 02/02/12
Thank you, John, for your comment. Is it something you have thoughts about already? I delayed in responding thinking that I would have time to research it well, but as it's the start of the semester, I haven't gotten as deeply as I'd like. The one thing I will say is that verse 10 appears to be setting up a contrast between rest as a place and as a state of being. Here the Greek is katapausin which the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament says is the "rest of God in the sense of his presence with the people." The commentary by O'Brien emphasizes that this is the actual place of rest, the presence, in contrast with the state of rest that would have been emphasized with a word derived from Shabbat. So we continue to strive to enter that place of God's presence by practicing the state of rest, that is, from ceasing from our work ("ergon"-- typical, generic word for work). O'Brien says, "the nature of the works themselves is not spelled out." I have not studied the nature of the works further, but I'd love to hear your thoughts!
Megan Hackman 9:55AM 01/30/12
Heb 4:1 Therefore, since the promise of entering his rest still stands, let us be careful that none of you be found to have fallen short of it. 2 For we also have had the gospel preached to us, just as they did; but the message they heard was of no value to them, because those who heard did not combine it with faith. 3 Now we who have believed enter that rest, just as God has said, “So I declared on oath in my anger, ‘They shall never enter my rest.’” The faithful and obedient are entering the Sabbath now. In verse 10 it says we rest from our works. What works do you think the author of Hebrews is referring to?
John 6:59PM 01/24/12

The Final Year: Trouble Focusing and the Need for a Jedi Master

January 20, 2012

Brian

Author’s Note: Journeys are strange. You hardly ever end up where you thought you would, and you definitely never get there in the manner that you conceived. That has been as true for me as it was for Jonah the morning he woke up to take a leisurely cruise to Tarshish. Over the next few weeks I will be writing a series of blog posts exploring how I came to and through seminary. It’s a strange tale with no straight lines. But it’s my story, and it is the path that the Lord has led our family down. It’s not idyllic. I hope that encourages you. Also, in case you just joined the conversation, Part 1 can be found here; Part 2 can be found here; Part 3 can be found here; Part 4 can be found here; Part 5 can be found here; Part 6 can be found here. Part 7 can be found here; Part 8 can be found here.

Remember senioritis? It hits everyone at some point during your final year of high school. For some people, it even starts in your junior year. But then you go to college and you are mature. You live on your own, you do your own laundry, you go to bed when you like and you eat what you like. Yet, when your senior year of college arrives, there it is again – dwelling in your being like a severe case of cabin fever for six straight months. You can’t think, you can’t focus, and that final exam just doesn’t seem as important as it did the year before. At times like these you need a Jedi master to sit down with you and say: “Discipline, young padawan. Be mindful of the present.”

The final year of my Master of Divinity, I was in my early thirties and had been in the work force for nearly a decade. So, I was completely blind-sided when senioritis hit me during the Fall semester of my final year in seminary. Yep, I suppose you’re never too mature for this plague upon students. Every time I sat down to read, a flock of thought-mosquitos would begin to buzz around in my brain (yes, I just made that word up… ‘thought-mosquitos’). Where would our family be next year? What would we be doing? Where would we live? On top of that, to help save money since I was no longer working, I studied during the days while also watching our youngest child. So, the few times that I was able to swat all of the mosquitos away, I would just begin to focus when a small cry would rise up and a bottle would need to be made. It was crazy. Yet somehow I made it through. And you can, too. How?

I needed a Jedi, as well. Someone tall, yet calm, with a beard. And an Irish accent (Yes, I love Liam Neeson). I needed him to sit down with me and remind me to be mindful of the present. But, unfortunately for us all, Jedis and midichlorians don’t really exist in our world. So, I had to look elsewhere. And I found my counsel in Scripture:

“‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the LORD, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.’” (Jeremiah 29:11)

Yes, I know that this is not spoken to each of us as individual Christians. This is something that God said to the surviving elders of the Israelite exiles. But it tells us of the type of God that we have. One that has a plan for us. One that has an eternal plan to prosper us and not to harm us. So I took that step – that hardest of steps for people like me – and I decided to stop worrying about my future. I set aside time to think about it, but then I entrusted it to God, knowing that he has a plan, and I was able to study. Indeed, it can be said that the Scriptures were my Jedi. And it can also be said that trusting God with my future was my mosquito spray.

Brian has an M.Div. (2010) from Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte campus, a Th.M. (2011) in Historical Theology from the South Hamilton campus, and is currently strengthening his language skills while in the MACH program. He hopes to matriculate into a doctoral program in August 2012 that will allow him to continue in his study of the thought of Augustine of Hippo. He has a wonderful wife, three great children, and spent ten years in ministry to teenagers, primarily with Young Life International.

Tags: Author: Brian , student blogger , thoughtfully evangelical

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Alumni Profile: Dr. Paul Borthwick

January 18, 2012

Ever wonder what people do after seminary? In the video below, we talk with Dr. Paul Borthwick (M.Div. '80, D.Min. '07), professor at Gordon College and on staff with Development Associates International about how his experience at Gordon-Conwell equipped him for a lifetime of missions work.

 

Tags: Alumni , current students , future students

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My Journey to Seminary: An Unexpected Gift

January 13, 2012

Brian

Author’s Note: Journeys are strange. You hardly ever end up where you thought you would, and you definitely never get there in the manner that you conceived. That has been as true for me as it was for Jonah the morning he woke up to take a leisurely cruise to Tarshish. Over the next few weeks I will be writing a series of blog posts exploring how I came to and through seminary. It’s a strange tale with no straight lines. But it’s my story, and it is the path that the Lord has led our family down. It’s not idyllic. I hope that encourages you. Also, in case you just joined the conversation, Part 1 can be found here; Part 2 can be found here; Part 3 can be found here; Part 4 can be found here; Part 5 can be found here; Part 6 can be found here. Part 7 can be found here.

After realizing that I was being called to a vocation of scholarship (which I wrote about in my last post in this series), a lot of changes came quickly for my family. Having gone to class part-time while working for six straight years, I was finished with two-thirds of my M.Div. My wife had a wonderful job as a nurse, and we decided to cut back (significantly) on our expenses so that I could attend school full-time and finish my M.Div. within the next year. After ten years in youth work, I notified the organization that I worked for (Young Life) that I would not be returning the following year, and they began a very healthy and patient process to find someone incredible to replace me (he is). It was an exciting time, but it was also a bit scary as we stepped away from our previous life and towards school – not knowing exactly where all of the finances that were necessary would come from.

Not everything about the transition to that final year was smooth or exciting. Learning to study again at a full-time pace was difficult – it took nearly a year for me to fully shake off the rust and get into a good groove. Our three children had spent most of their conscious moments in our town, but with a 2 ½ hour commute to Charlotte it seemed like a foregone conclusion that we had to move (from a house to an apartment…not as fun when your family is now five instead of two). We had wonderful friends in the area as well, and leaving them was heartbreaking.

I could probably continue this post and give a gaggle of details that mean a lot to me but not as much to you. But, since I remember the days that my wife first took me to her hometown and I was caught in massive groups of people that I didn’t know without any possible way to remember all of their names or the stories surrounding them, I won’t. Instead, I want to encourage you with one story…

Although many things were hard and difficult, God gave our family an amazing year that final year of my M.Div. I had considered it a foregone conclusion that our family was moving to Charlotte, as difficult as that was. My wife, however, felt that God was going to open up a way for our family to stay in the area. We lived in a beautiful resort town, and the cost of living there combined with travel expenses made staying financially impossible. So my wife prayed while I chuckled and worked on logistical issues. And then, right when we were preparing a trip to look at apartments in Charlotte, God came through with a miracle (O, me of little faith). While volunteering at our Young Life fundraising golf tournament, my wife began telling our story to a donor who had come to the tournament to share her story about becoming a Christian through Young Life when she was in high school. She asked how much we could afford (it was miniscule), and then said that she had an idea. A few days later she called my wife and invited her to come take a look at a rental home that they had, one that they would rent to us within our tiny budget. The house was huge. And gorgeous. And in a great neighborhood. In fact, we had never lived in such a wonderful home. That was the beginning of a wonderful year for our family – one that allowed us to stay within our community in a beautiful home while I was in the midst of a vocational change.

I am not telling you my story so that you think “God will give me things if I go to seminary!” Those of us here know that is not the case. In fact, I have never had less financial margin in my life, and I am going into this final semester at GCTS hoping that I will be able to pull together all of the loose financial ends. I am writing to encourage you that, if God is calling you to seminary, you should go. If you’re already here, figure out a way to stay (if the calling is from God). It looks bleak, and it won’t turn out the way you envision, but he knows your future, and he knows exactly what you need, when you need it. For our family, it was a house for a year. For you, it is probably something quite different.

Oh, and don’t chuckle at your spouse when they are praying for something.

“Trust in the LORD with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding.
In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.“ Proverbs 3:5-6

Brian has an M.Div. (2010) from Gordon-Conwell’s Charlotte campus, a Th.M. (2011) in Historical Theology from the South Hamilton campus, and is currently strengthening his language skills while in the MACH program. He hopes to matriculate into a doctoral program in August 2012 that will allow him to continue in his study of the thought of Augustine of Hippo. He has a wonderful wife, three great children, and spent ten years in ministry to teenagers, primarily with Young Life International.

Tags: Author: Brian , student blogger

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Quest for the Games or the Gospel?

January 06, 2012

Megan Hackman

(SPOILER ALERT! If you have not read the Hunger Games series, it won’t bother you to continue. But if you’re in the middle of book three, this may spoil the ending for you.)

The goal of the Hunger Games is survival. This is the quest. The only quest. The only conceivable quest for the districts, the tributes, and even the President is survival. As modern readers, we want more. And so we’re given a love triangle, science fiction creatures, futuristic fashion, weddings, funerals, Roman-like arenas, history lessons, herbalist and medicinal instruction… there really is something for everyone! I caught the craze, and with a list like that, I can see where others have as well.

And yet, the quest is not our quest. Is life just about survival? What about hope? Identity? A future? Redemption? Even for those not as consciously theological, I can imagine a dissatisfaction that the characters are unable to be successful on quests for revenge, success, or even legacy in light of their overwhelming need just to survive. These goals are all taken away from the people of Panem (the nation of the Hunger Games) by its totalitarian rulers who require a yearly child sacrifice as penalty for their rebellion.

So why are we so wrapped up in a story line that ends with the achievement of mere survival for barely more than one character? (sorry, warned you about the spoiler alert) I know I’m fascinated by its nature as a cautionary tale. What if this world were only about survival? Would you still value your life? What kind of reaction would I have to such authority over me? Could I survive?

What if we had a Creator God who stepped away and said, “May the odds be ever in your favor,” so to speak, and then sent us into an arena in which survival were only merely possible? There you have Panem. You have a de-humanized authority and a hero who does not have the power to save. Who is unable to redeem. Who is horrifically broken and unable to be healed, even after the quest for survival has met its end. And I hear in the speech and behavior of friends outside of the Church a similar expression of God—in which the Creator has left us to a life of luck and a quest for success against the odds. Yet, there is a belief and a drivenness today that one might actually by his own power save, redeem, and overcome.

I was struck by how unlike this quest is from the message of the Gospel. In our story, the ultimate authority has become the most intimate of creatures with a quest not for survival but for the healing and unity of the entire world. The shock of the Gospel message is, too, that the means for “life and life abundantly” (John 10:10), is through the sacrifice of our hero in death (1 Corinthians 5:21)!

While reading the series, I rode the wave of hope that this one young girl symbolically became hope for an entire nation, unifying people under the symbol of freedom. But the symbolic hope she represented was surpassed by her own quest for a survival. Finally, both quests lead not to the healing and unity of the entire world but a dark commentary on the individual’s and the world’s resonate brokenness.

I finished the first book months ago and the series over Christmas, and yet, I cannot get these themes nor the characters out of my head. I think the series’ magnetism for me has to do with the people I know in this world who are living under this false quest to survive with a false belief that they, themselves, have the power to overcome but without realizing that the work of healing and redemption is accomplished by Jesus. It’s like I want to sit down with Katniss and Peeta and talk about life as so much more than survival. I want to assure them that there is eternal and present justice for their brokenness. I feel like Suzanne Collins must know this because she gave us plenty of diversions so that we would maintain hope for the people of Panem. To me, though, the finishing tone was hopeless and broken.

What do you think has you enthralled with the series? Do you think survival is Katniss’ sole quest? Do you think a social and economic commentary is all that can be harvested from this series?

Megan Hackman and her husband, Larry, are M.Div. students at Gordon-Conwell's Hamilton campus.

Tags: Author: Megan Hackman , equipping leaders for the church and society , student blogger , thoughtfully evangelical

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John, I had not thought of what you suggested! By the time I got to the end of book 3, I suppose I had forgotten how Katniss got involved in the Games to begin with. When I thought about having a hypothetical conversation with fictional characters (what has this book done to me?! Ha!), I hadn't thought about Peeta's character in comparison with Katniss. Great distinction. Thank you for pushing me to think about survival in different terms! I'm thinking more in the direction of survival in this life in contrast with hope of eternal life when I think about survival. Even Katniss' move to offer herself as tribute was a guard against Prim's life in the "present." I was surprised by the lack of hope beyond this life and the possibility of healing and redemption for this life. And so, the quest for survival was a quest to see survival in this life but the hero was unable to bring about anything more than mere, individual survival. This is what is rendered so dark and ultimately hopeless because the characters are unable to provide for themselves healing and redemption in their lives. The modern person and the characters of this book could not hope for anything beyond the best of what this life could offer within their own power. I'm a verbal processor... keep it coming!
Megan Hackman 9:03PM 01/07/12
Dear Megan, Your blog seems to hit on several different issues. I have a lot of things I want to say in response, but they are not exactly interrelated. So, I'll start with a basic book review. Is life just about survival? I’m not sure if Katniss would say “yes,” as you seem to imply she would. If she wanted just to survive, she wouldn’t have taken her sister’s place in the games in the first place. Also, don't forget that she was planning to kill herself at the end of book 1. So, I think this is evidence that she believed in something bigger than just survival. Furthermore, it doesn’t seem fair to judge her survival instinct so harshly when extreme, external circumstances put her in a game and a war that demanded survival. Katniss was not a cruel person just climbing a corporate/social/political/popularity ladder, stepping on bodies as she ascended. If she were she could have killed her game allies while they slept; she had to either fight or die. What would her lying down and dying have accomplished? So, I think it is incorrect to say, “But the symbolic hope she represented was surpassed by her own quest for a survival. Finally, both quests lead not to the healing and unity of the entire world but a dark commentary on the individual’s and the world’s resonate brokenness.” Considering at the end of the series she was willing to forfeit her life by killing Coin, the leader of the rebellion, to keep the new administration from using enemy children in another Hunger Games, says a lot about her character and willingness to sacrifice herself for the freedom of others (not to mention how many times during the war she ran into a fight to save someone else). Then, you say you wish you could sit down with Katniss and Peeta and explain that life is so much more than survival. As I said, I don't think Katniss believes this, but I certainly don't think Peeta does. Before going into the games he stated he wanted the empire to know they don't own him. He will not become a mindless killing machine for their entertainment. He is a human being with dignity and inherent value. He will not let them turn him into an animal. But, perhaps I am misunderstanding what you mean by the word "survival." When you say that these Katniss, Peeta, and even some people you know only care only about survival and try to heal themselves, what do you mean? Thanks for the thought provoking blog. John
John Hutchins 2008 5:38PM 01/06/12

Full-Tuition Scholarship at Gordon-Conwell

January 04, 2012

Gordon-Conwell recently announced the new Partnership Program, which provides a full-tuition scholarship and biblical stewardship training. Take a moment to watch the video below to hear some of our Partnership students share their thoughts and experiences with this program.

Tags: current students , equipping leaders for the church and society , future students , training

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I was wondering if Gordon-Conwelll offers a full-tuition scholarship for students. I agree with you Daniel that everyone should apply for these scholarship as it is a great opportunity for all students. Thanks for this great info.
SAP Fico Training 4:23AM 01/31/12
Thanks for this great resources. The first place that many people will look when searching for information about how to get a college scholarship.this is a great resource that Everyone should take advantage. Whether you are a high school student who is still deciding what they want to be when they grow up or an adult that wants to make a lifestyle change and finally start working towards a college degree, one of the best things you can do is apply for student scholarships to pay for college. By taking some time to find out about scholarships and if they are the right choice for you, you can potentially save yourself a large chunk of money and get an education as well.
Daniel 6:11AM 01/11/12

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