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    Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary
    Doctor of Ministry Office
    130 Essex Street
    South Hamilton, MA 01982
    1-800-816-1837
    Fax: (978) 646-4574
    dmin@gcts.edu
    Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. M-F
     

  • Tracks »

    Take a look at our Doctor of Ministry tracks.

Christian Leadership

Informing spiritual passions by...

Forming mentored learning communities, thereby...

Transforming ministers and ministries for a lifetime.

Dates: TBA (2016)
Campus: Charlotte
Primary Faculty Mentors:

Dr. Tim Laniak, Dr. Steve Klipowicz

To learn more about Dr. Tim Laniak and his heart for leadership, consider attending his Shepherding Workshop.

  Advanced Standing for Arrow Leadership

Request more information or apply today!

Informing

In times of national and international turmoil, men and women instinctively look for a leader. Both society and the Church cry for those who have a vision, who can make their vision known, and who can inspire others to take up a cause greater than themselves. This track helps you prepare to share your God-given vision and to become a leader for Christ's cause in the world.

Here is what John Pellowe (D.Min., '08) has to say about the track.

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Forming

As a Doctor of Ministry student, you attend three two-week intensive residencies which consist of lectures, case studies, participant reports and individual consultations. The classroom sessions are collegial in style and stress learning within a community context. In preparation for each residency, you read between 2,000 and 3,000 pages of assigned and collateral reading. Sample reading for the first residency includes:

  • CD-ROM, “Leadership in the 21 st Century”, published by the Center for the Development of Evangelical Leadership, 2001, edited by Wayne Goodwin. (May be purchased at a reduced rate from the Gordon-Conwell Bookstore in Charlotte).
  • Anderson, Ray S. The Soul of Ministry: Forming Leaders for God’s People. (Westminster John Knox Press, 1997).
  • Bennett, D. W., Metaphors of Ministry (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 1993).
  • Blackaby, Henry T., and King, Claude V. Experiencing God: How to Live the Full Adventure of Knowing and Doing the Will of God. (Boardman and Holman, 1998).
  • Bolman, L. G. & T. E. Deal, Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice, and Leadership (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997).
  • Leadership (New York: Harper & Row, 1978).
  • Eldredge, John. Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man’s Soul. (Nelson Books, 2001).
  • Ford, L., Transforming Leadership: Jesus’ Way of Creating Vision, Shaping Values & Empowering Change (Downers Grove, IL: 1991).
  • Foster, Richard J. Prayer: Finding the Heart’s True Home. (Harper San Francisco, 2003).
  • “The Case Study Method: An Exegetical Approach to Evaluating the Practice of Ministry”. (Available from Gordon-Conwell Bookstore—Charlotte).
  • Guinness, Os. The Call: Finding and Fulfilling the Central Purpose of Your Life. (Word Books, 1998).
  • Harbaugh, Gary L. Pastor as Person: Maintaining Personal Integrity in the Choices and Challenges of Ministry. (Augsburg, 1984).
  • Heschel, A. J., The Prophets (New York: Harper & Row, 1962) Use Hendrickson, 2004 edn.
  • Kingsolver, B., The Poisonwood Bible (New York: HarperCollins, 1999).
  • Laniak, T. S., Shepherds After My Own Heart: Pastoral Traditions and Leadership in the Bible ( Leicester, UK: InterVarsity Press, March, 2006).
  • McNeal, R., A Work of Heart ( San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2000).
  • Northouse, Peter G. Leadership: Theory and Practice. (Sage, 2003).
  • Peterson, Eugene. The Contemplative Pastor: Returning to the Art of Spiritual Direction. (Wm. B. Eeerdmans, 1993).
  • Five Smooth Stones for Pastoral Work(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1980).
  • Prochaska, J. O., J. C. Norcross, & C. C. DiClemente, Changing for Good (New York: Avon, 1994).
  • Ryken L., Words of Delight (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1992).
  • Senge, P., The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization (NY: Doubleday, 1990, 1994).
  • Thrall, B., B. McNicol, & K. McElrath, The Ascent of a Leader (San Francisco, CA: Jossey- Bass Publishers, 1999).
  • “What Ever Happened to My Call to Ministry” tape series, Rosell, Kaiser, Packer. (Available from the Gordon-Conwell BookCentre).
  • Warren, Rick. The Purpose-Driven Life: What on Earth am I Here for? (Zondervan, 2002).

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Transforming

Residency 1: “Being: Personal and Ministerial Identity”

Residency 1 introduces biblical theology and case study method as foundational tools for reflection on leadership. The focus is on “being” or “ortho-ontology”. We emphasize the person and character of the Christian leader in terms of the image of God. This is the residency of the heart. The following topics receive attention: the nature and aspects of one’s relationship with God, spiritual formation and integrity, ministerial identity, the call(s) to ministry, and leading in worship (the priestly role). It is expected that students will develop in both the cognitive and affective domains, and will become equipped in self-assessment.

Residency 2: “Becoming: Paradigms for Transformation”

Residency 2 examines foundational biblical/theological principles and social scientific paradigms that bring perspective to Christian leadership and community transformation. The focus is on “becoming” or “ortho-doxy”. This residency emphasizes the role of the eye, stressing the significance of perception. Because of the importance placed on critical consideration of conceptual paradigms, this is also the residency of the mind. Topics include the nature of true change and development, the prophetic role of leaders, organizational learning, group dynamics, social roles, reframing, and narrative/story-telling.

Residency 3: “Doing: Contexts and Competencies”

Residency 3 explores the biblical and theological framework that governs consistent ministry practice. This is the residency of the hand. The focus is on “doing” or “ortho-praxis,” i.e., gifts and skills, values, and competency in ministry. Topics include culture, conflict, power, ethics, planning, church health, mentoring, succession, and the “royal” role of leaders.

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